Contact Us
  Home Page button About Us button Our Projects button How You Can Help button Country Profile Resources button
 
  Health button Schools button
Water&Sanitation button
Agriculture button Environment button Heritage button  
 
 
   
 

Most rural Ethiopians walk up to four kilometres every day just to fetch water.  Even then they canít be sure itís safe to drink.  As a result, many people suffer from water-borne diseases and 15 percent of all deaths in Ethiopia are from diarrhoea, with the highest death rate among young children.

Diarrhoeal diseases caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation, such as cholera, typhoid and dysentery, are common across the developing world - killing 5,000 children every single day.  People suffering from these diseases, or caring for children who are ill from them, are often unable to work to earn money, yet face large medical bills.

  On average, Ethiopians consume only about 15 litres of water a day for all of their needs (compared about 150 litres for the average Briton), far less in rural areas.  Only a third of people in Ethiopia use latrines.

Carrying the heavy water containers back home is an exhausting task, which takes up valuable time and energy.  It often prevents women from doing vital domestic or income generating work and stops children from going to school. 

 

The Ethiopian Government has set itself the goal of ensuring that, by 2012, all people in rural parts of the country have access to 15 litres of water every day and that water sources are located only a short (under 1.5 kilometres) walk from their homes.  It may sound a modest target to people in the UK, but in Ethiopia there can be no doubt it's an ambitious one.

There is an urgent need for action, but all too often water and sanitation are overlooked in global development agenda, despite being consistently cited as top priorities by communities themselves.  Total global investments in water and sanitation would need to double for the Millennium Development Goal target, of halving the proportions of people living without water and sanitation by 2015, to be met.

   
 
 

Top

   
   
    MORE ON WATER & SANITATION:
 
   
    RELATED TOPICS:
 
   
   
 

Access to improved drinking water

Estimated total coverage for:

Total (%)

Urban (%)

Rural (%)

2008 38 98 26
2005 35 95 24
2000 28 88 18
1995 22 82 12
1990 17 77 8
   
 
Access to improved sanitation

Estimated total coverage for:

Total (%)

Urban (%)

Rural (%)

2008 12 29 8
2005 10 28 7
2000 8 26 5
1995 5 23 2
1990 4 21 1
  WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme
 

Make a Donation button
Everyclick logo button

   
  If you encounter any problems using
our website, please contact us.